Animal Welfare Evaluation of Gas Stunning (Controlled Atmosphere Stunning) of Chickens and other Poultry

Controlled atmosphere stunning has several welfare advantages. Handling stress is reduced because live chickens no longer have to be hung on the shackles. Another...

Nearly 60% of US broilers now raised without antibiotics, but that number may have...

Source: Poultryhealthtoday.com Almost six in 10 US broilers were raised without antibiotics of any type in 2019 — but that number may have peaked, according...

Why maintain broiler breeders within their thermal comfort zone post-brooding?

Broiler Breeder Management How-to’s provided by Aviagen Tip #10 The thermal comfort zone is the temperature range within which a bird does not have to expend...

Pollo-M The certified exhaust air washer for broiler houses

Pollo-M The certified exhaust air washer for broiler houses Pollo-M is a single-stage chemical exhaust air washer for use in broiler growing. The filter element is...

Male Aggression in Broiler Breeders

Dr. Ian Duncan continues to study male aggression in broiler breeders, a problem that appears to be on the increase. His lab initiated a...

Cobb Asia Debuts New Module-Based Technical School

Team Reviews Broiler Management During First Module in Bali Cobb Asia recently debuted a new module-based technical school in Bali focusing on broiler management. This...

How Much Water Does Your Evaporative Cooling System Need?

Figure 1. A typical broiler house with an evaporative cooling system and tunnel exhaust fans. The exhaust fans are visible at the far left,...

CFIA Humane Transportation Regulations Fact Sheet now available

The new CFIA Humane Transportation Regulations for livestock has now come into affect.  For broiler chickens and spent hens the maximum interval without water...

Why individually weight broiler breeder females in production?

Broiler Breeder Management How-to’s provided by Aviagen Tip #6 Birds should be weighed at least weekly after transfer to the production facility.
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